Friday, 11 May 2012

How To Develop Your Elevator Pitch


I was at a Case Conference earlier this year on Campaign Planning and believe me, it was an eye opener for a number of different reasons. One question they asked us early in the day was to list three things about the organistation you work for that sets your organisation apart from the rest – your unique selling points – your elevator speech.

It got me thinking that in a fast moving world drowned in messages, your organisation needs to have the ‘Elevator Pitch’ that everybody associated with you can deliver. What can you possibly say in such a short time (c.60seconds) that will make potential donors want to hear more?


What your "Elevator Pitch" should contain:


  • A "hook"
- Open your pitch by getting the donor’s attention with a "hook” which is a statement or question that piques their interest to want to hear more about your organisation. 
 
  • About 150-225 words - 
Your pitch should last no longer than 60 seconds. 
 
  • Passion - Donors expect energy and dedication from organisations. 
 
  • A request - At the end of your pitch, you must ask for something.  Do you want their business card, to schedule a meeting, a solicitation or to ask them to get involved more?  

Here are questions that will help you develop this pitch. 


  • Why does your organisation exist?
    • An organisation's mission is the single, core, solitary reason it exists.
    • What’s your Vision?
  • What does it do?
    • How does your organisation change the world?
  • How does it do it?
  • Where is it going?
    • Strategic Plan 
    • Vision
  • Why is it deserving of support?
    • Why should they give to you instead of donating elsewhere?
  • What are your unique selling points?
    • What separates you from similar non-profits/charities?



What’s your elevator pitch? Tweet me some examples.


Niamh
@niamhini

1 comment:

  1. This exact question came up in a meeting I was in recently. Essential advice: your elevator speech should not include the words 'asbestos' or 'decant'. #Fact

    ReplyDelete